Feldgrau.com - research on the German armed forces 1918-1945
 132.Infanterie-Division by Jason Pipes
Unit Emblems

                  

Lineage


Traditions


Absorbed


Mobilized


Campaigns

  • Balkans 1941
  • Eastern Front 1941-1945

    Notable Points


    Nicknames


    Fate


    History

    The 132.Infanterie-Division was formed on October 5th, 1940 as a part of the 11th Wave. It was formed from parts of the 27.Infanterie-Division, the 263.Infanterie-Division and the 268.Infanterie-Division.

    The 132.Infanterie-Division first saw action in the Balkans Region on anti-partisan and security operations, moving through the areas of Marburg/Drau-Cilli-Agram-Banja Luka to the area of Sarajevo. The Division was relieved by the 718.Infanterie-Division in late May of 1941. After security duties in the occupied areas of the Balkans, the Division was transfered to the Eastern Front in preperation for the planned attack on the Soviet Union.

    During the Invasion of the Soviet Union the 132.Infanterie-Division advanced through Lemberg, Ostrog/Rowno, Shitomir and other areas until it arrived in the area of Kiev. It took part in the fighting at Jusefowka, Berejaslaw and Jerkowzy, and later paused near the region of Cherson-Perekop at the start of the Crimea. After taking part in the advance into the Crimea in November of 1941, the Divisions main service was during the siege of the Soviet fortress of Sevestapol at the southwestern base of the Crimean Peninsula. The Division took part in not only the seige but also the assault into the city itself and helped to crush the Russian defenses and take the vitally important city. The 132.Infanterie-Division fought in the Crimea from November 1941 until September of 1942, when it was transfered to Armeegruppe Nord.

    After seeing action in the Crimea region, in September of 1942, the 132.Infanterie-Division was shifted to the Leningrad Front where it became a part of the 18.Armee which was attempting to break through the lines around the city. It fought in the Mga positions, at Gaitolowo and Tschernaja. It help positions against the Pogostje Pocket, and fought at Smerdynia as well. Unlike Sevestapol though, Leningrad held and in 1944 the 132.Infanterie-Division was eventually forced into a series of withdrawls and retreats, finally ending the War in the Kourland Pocket, trapped by the rapidly advancing Soviets until its surrender in May of 1945.

    Organization

    Order of Battle
    Infanterie-Regiment 436
    Infanterie-Regiment 437
    Infanterie-Regiment 438
    Artillerie-Regiment 132
    Division-Füsilier-Batallon 132
    Panzerjäger-Abteilung 132
    Pionier-Bataillon 132
    Nachrichten-Abteiliung 132
    Sanitäts-Abteilung 132
    Feldersatz-Bataillon 132

    Commanders


    Knights Cross Holders



    War Service

    Dates
    Korps
    Armee
    Armeegrupp
    Area
    11.40 L 2. Armee C Landshut
    12.40 - 2.41 LI 2. Armee C Landshut
    3.41 LV 2. Armee C Landshut
    4.41 - 6.41 LI 2. Armee - Yugoslavia
    7.41 XXXIV - OKH South Russia
    8.41 IV 6. Armee Süd Kiev
    9.41 XXXIV 6. Armee Süd Kiev
    10.41 reserve - Süd Nikolayev, Krivoi-Rog
    11.41 - 12.41 LIV 11. Armee Süd Perekop, Crimea
    1.42 LIV 11. Armee Süd Crimea
    2.42 - 5.42 XXX 11. Armee Süd Kertsch
    6.42 - 7.42 LIV 11. Armee Süd Sevastopol
    8.42 XXXXII 11. Armee A Kertsch
    9.42 XXXXII Krim A Kertsch
    10.42 XXX 11. Armee Nord Leningrad
    11.42 - 5.43 XXVIII 18. Armee Nord Leningrad
    6.43 reserve 18. Armee Nord Leningrad
    7.43 - 11.43 XXVIII 18. Armee Nord Leningrad
    12.43 - 1.44 VIII 16. Armee Nord Newel
    2.44 I 16. Armee Nord Opotschka
    3.44 X 16. Armee Nord Opotschka
    4.44 reserve 16. Armee Nord Opotschka
    5.44 - 6.44 L 16. Armee Nord Polozk
    7.44 II 16. Armee Nord Dünaburg
    8.44 - 9.44 X 18. Armee Nord Latvia
    10.44 reserve 16. Armee Nord Riga
    11.44 II 18. Armee Nord Courland
    12.44 Tomaschki 16. Armee Nord Courland
    1.45 X 18. Armee Nord Courland
    2.45 X 18. Armee Kurland Courland
    3.45 - 4.45 I 18. Armee Kurland Courland

    Bibliography



  • Die deutschen Infanterie-Divisonen, Band 1-3, by Werner Haupt
  • Die deutsche Feldpostübersicht 1939-1945, Band 1-3, by Nobert Kannapin
  • Die Pflege der Tradition der alten Armee in Reichsheer und im der Wehrmacht, by Schirmer/Wiener
  • Die Truppenkennzeichen... der deutchen Wehrmacht u. Waffen-SS, Band 1-4, by Schmitz/Thies
  • Der Zweite Weltkrieg im Kartenbild, Band 1-3, by Klaus-Jurgen Thies
  • Deutsche Verbände und Truppen 1918-1939, by George Tessin
  • Verbände und Truppen der deutchen Wehrmacht und Waffen-SS..., Band 1-14, by Georg Tessin
  • Formationsgeschichte und Stellenbesetzung 1815-1939, Teil 1, der deutschen Heer, Band 1-3, by Günter Wegner
  • Die Deutsche Wehrmacht u. Waffen-SS, Ihre Kommando. u. Großverbände... im Zweiten Weltkrieg, author unknown
  • Das Reichsheer und Seine Tradition, author unknown
  • Deutsche Rote Kreuz Suchdienst, Divisionsschicksale, author unknown

  • Reforging the Iron Cross, The Search for Tradition..., by Donald Abenheim
  • The German Infantry Handbook 1939-1945, by Alex Buchner
  • German Army Order of Battle: The Replacement Army 1939-1945, by Victor Madej
  • German Army Order of Battle: Field Army and Officer Corps 1939-1945, by Victor Madej
  • Hitler's Legions, by Samuel Mitcham
  • German Order of Battle World War II, Vol I, by George Nafziger
  • German Order of Battle 1944, author unknown

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    Created, maintained and Copyright © 1996-2009, Jason Pipes